Feb 252014
 

Can Eating Too Much Kale Be Bad For You?

Dr. Oz loves kale and has often spoken about how nutritionally dense is and how our bodies can benefit from Kale.  However, can eating too much Kale be bad for you?  During this segment on today’s show Dr. Oz talks about some recent research that eating too much Kale can put you at an increased risk for kidney stones.

Kale and Kidney Stones

Dr. Oz doesn’t want his viewers to stop eating kale.  There are just too many healthy benefits of eating Kale.  However, there is some research that may indicate that too much of a good thing may lead to potential health risks.  Research suggests that eating large amounts of kale can put you at increased risks for kidney stones.  Dr. Oz said that there is a simple solution.  He said that you should alternate your “greens”.  Don’t just eat kale all the time.  Mix it up with spinach, arugula, collard greens, bok choy, etc…  Dr. Oz said that most of the concerns about kidney stones are for those that have a family history of being prone to kidney stones.

Kale May Interfere With Blood Thinning Medications

There is one more concern about Kale that Dr. Oz wanted to point out to the audience and the viewers at home.  The rich amounts of Vitamin K in Kale can interfere with certain medications.  If you are taking blood thinners or antibiotics the Vitamin K can cause these medications to be less effective.  If you are taking blood thinners or antibiotics Dr. Oz said that there is a simple alternative.  Instead of eating kale choose a green vegetable that isn’t high in vitamin K.

Green Vegetables That Are Low In Vitamin K

If you are on blood thinners or antibiotics eat more green vegetables that are not high in Vitamin K like :

  • Romain Lettuce
  • Green Beans
  • Cabbage
  • Asparagus

Are you a fan of Dr. Oz but unable to view his show as often as you would like?  Consider Liking “Fans of Dr. Oz” on Facebook to view daily show recaps and summaries so you don’t miss out on any of the topics discussed on his show.

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Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and is not intended to convey medical advice or to substitute for advice from your own physician.